Blogs

Blogs

Community Events and Support

African American FTD Challenges

Understanding and Overcoming Challenges in FTD

February 23, 20241 min read

In 2011, it was estimated that there were 50,000-60,000 cases of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in the U.S. Recent research suggests that this number is likely higher due to a lack of representation in studies, especially among Black/African American communities.

Research has shown that Black/African Americans often face obstacles in getting a timely FTD diagnosis. A survey revealed they are less likely to receive prompt diagnoses and often consult with four or more doctors before getting one. Additionally, the symptoms of FTD can present differently in different ethnic/cultural groups.

Black families have reported difficulties convincing practitioners of FTD concerns, leading to delays in diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis may result in higher severity of dementia.

FTD-related symptoms, like disinhibition, can create problems in social situations and with the justice system. Black families face added concerns due to a higher impact from police brutality.

Inclusive FTD Research Initiatives

A study found that families dealing with FTD face nearly twice the annual costs compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. Black/African American families, already facing systemic inequalities, experience heightened challenges.

Efforts are underway to address these challenges. Initiatives focus on inclusive research, overcoming economic and health insurance obstacles, and educating communities. The Biomarker Evaluation in Young Onset Dementia from Diverse Populations (BEYONDD) study aims to understand young-onset dementia in diverse populations, making participation more accessible.

The Alter program collaborates with Black faith communities to create dementia-friendly environments. This program aims to educate, modify environments, and guide congregational leaders in providing support to Black/African American families facing FTD.

Article Resources:

For more information, read the Partners in FTD Care issue on Black/African Americans and FTD.

You can get more articles like these from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration.

If you have questions or need support, reach out to the AFTD HelpLine at 1-866-507-7222 or [email protected].

FTD ChallengesAfrican American FTDDementia BarriersAFTD SupportFrontotemporal Dementia challenges in Black familiesInitiatives for inclusive research on FTD in diverse populations
Back to Blog

Fraud Prevention and Awareness

African American FTD Challenges

Understanding and Overcoming Challenges in FTD

February 23, 20241 min read

In 2011, it was estimated that there were 50,000-60,000 cases of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in the U.S. Recent research suggests that this number is likely higher due to a lack of representation in studies, especially among Black/African American communities.

Research has shown that Black/African Americans often face obstacles in getting a timely FTD diagnosis. A survey revealed they are less likely to receive prompt diagnoses and often consult with four or more doctors before getting one. Additionally, the symptoms of FTD can present differently in different ethnic/cultural groups.

Black families have reported difficulties convincing practitioners of FTD concerns, leading to delays in diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis may result in higher severity of dementia.

FTD-related symptoms, like disinhibition, can create problems in social situations and with the justice system. Black families face added concerns due to a higher impact from police brutality.

Inclusive FTD Research Initiatives

A study found that families dealing with FTD face nearly twice the annual costs compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. Black/African American families, already facing systemic inequalities, experience heightened challenges.

Efforts are underway to address these challenges. Initiatives focus on inclusive research, overcoming economic and health insurance obstacles, and educating communities. The Biomarker Evaluation in Young Onset Dementia from Diverse Populations (BEYONDD) study aims to understand young-onset dementia in diverse populations, making participation more accessible.

The Alter program collaborates with Black faith communities to create dementia-friendly environments. This program aims to educate, modify environments, and guide congregational leaders in providing support to Black/African American families facing FTD.

Article Resources:

For more information, read the Partners in FTD Care issue on Black/African Americans and FTD.

You can get more articles like these from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration.

If you have questions or need support, reach out to the AFTD HelpLine at 1-866-507-7222 or [email protected].

FTD ChallengesAfrican American FTDDementia BarriersAFTD SupportFrontotemporal Dementia challenges in Black familiesInitiatives for inclusive research on FTD in diverse populations
Back to Blog

Elder Care Tips

African American FTD Challenges

Understanding and Overcoming Challenges in FTD

February 23, 20241 min read

In 2011, it was estimated that there were 50,000-60,000 cases of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in the U.S. Recent research suggests that this number is likely higher due to a lack of representation in studies, especially among Black/African American communities.

Research has shown that Black/African Americans often face obstacles in getting a timely FTD diagnosis. A survey revealed they are less likely to receive prompt diagnoses and often consult with four or more doctors before getting one. Additionally, the symptoms of FTD can present differently in different ethnic/cultural groups.

Black families have reported difficulties convincing practitioners of FTD concerns, leading to delays in diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis may result in higher severity of dementia.

FTD-related symptoms, like disinhibition, can create problems in social situations and with the justice system. Black families face added concerns due to a higher impact from police brutality.

Inclusive FTD Research Initiatives

A study found that families dealing with FTD face nearly twice the annual costs compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. Black/African American families, already facing systemic inequalities, experience heightened challenges.

Efforts are underway to address these challenges. Initiatives focus on inclusive research, overcoming economic and health insurance obstacles, and educating communities. The Biomarker Evaluation in Young Onset Dementia from Diverse Populations (BEYONDD) study aims to understand young-onset dementia in diverse populations, making participation more accessible.

The Alter program collaborates with Black faith communities to create dementia-friendly environments. This program aims to educate, modify environments, and guide congregational leaders in providing support to Black/African American families facing FTD.

Article Resources:

For more information, read the Partners in FTD Care issue on Black/African Americans and FTD.

You can get more articles like these from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration.

If you have questions or need support, reach out to the AFTD HelpLine at 1-866-507-7222 or [email protected].

FTD ChallengesAfrican American FTDDementia BarriersAFTD SupportFrontotemporal Dementia challenges in Black familiesInitiatives for inclusive research on FTD in diverse populations
Back to Blog

Healthcare and Medical Guidance

African American FTD Challenges

Understanding and Overcoming Challenges in FTD

February 23, 20241 min read

In 2011, it was estimated that there were 50,000-60,000 cases of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in the U.S. Recent research suggests that this number is likely higher due to a lack of representation in studies, especially among Black/African American communities.

Research has shown that Black/African Americans often face obstacles in getting a timely FTD diagnosis. A survey revealed they are less likely to receive prompt diagnoses and often consult with four or more doctors before getting one. Additionally, the symptoms of FTD can present differently in different ethnic/cultural groups.

Black families have reported difficulties convincing practitioners of FTD concerns, leading to delays in diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis may result in higher severity of dementia.

FTD-related symptoms, like disinhibition, can create problems in social situations and with the justice system. Black families face added concerns due to a higher impact from police brutality.

Inclusive FTD Research Initiatives

A study found that families dealing with FTD face nearly twice the annual costs compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. Black/African American families, already facing systemic inequalities, experience heightened challenges.

Efforts are underway to address these challenges. Initiatives focus on inclusive research, overcoming economic and health insurance obstacles, and educating communities. The Biomarker Evaluation in Young Onset Dementia from Diverse Populations (BEYONDD) study aims to understand young-onset dementia in diverse populations, making participation more accessible.

The Alter program collaborates with Black faith communities to create dementia-friendly environments. This program aims to educate, modify environments, and guide congregational leaders in providing support to Black/African American families facing FTD.

Article Resources:

For more information, read the Partners in FTD Care issue on Black/African Americans and FTD.

You can get more articles like these from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration.

If you have questions or need support, reach out to the AFTD HelpLine at 1-866-507-7222 or [email protected].

FTD ChallengesAfrican American FTDDementia BarriersAFTD SupportFrontotemporal Dementia challenges in Black familiesInitiatives for inclusive research on FTD in diverse populations
Back to Blog

Support Groups

African American FTD Challenges

Understanding and Overcoming Challenges in FTD

February 23, 20241 min read

In 2011, it was estimated that there were 50,000-60,000 cases of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in the U.S. Recent research suggests that this number is likely higher due to a lack of representation in studies, especially among Black/African American communities.

Research has shown that Black/African Americans often face obstacles in getting a timely FTD diagnosis. A survey revealed they are less likely to receive prompt diagnoses and often consult with four or more doctors before getting one. Additionally, the symptoms of FTD can present differently in different ethnic/cultural groups.

Black families have reported difficulties convincing practitioners of FTD concerns, leading to delays in diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis may result in higher severity of dementia.

FTD-related symptoms, like disinhibition, can create problems in social situations and with the justice system. Black families face added concerns due to a higher impact from police brutality.

Inclusive FTD Research Initiatives

A study found that families dealing with FTD face nearly twice the annual costs compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. Black/African American families, already facing systemic inequalities, experience heightened challenges.

Efforts are underway to address these challenges. Initiatives focus on inclusive research, overcoming economic and health insurance obstacles, and educating communities. The Biomarker Evaluation in Young Onset Dementia from Diverse Populations (BEYONDD) study aims to understand young-onset dementia in diverse populations, making participation more accessible.

The Alter program collaborates with Black faith communities to create dementia-friendly environments. This program aims to educate, modify environments, and guide congregational leaders in providing support to Black/African American families facing FTD.

Article Resources:

For more information, read the Partners in FTD Care issue on Black/African Americans and FTD.

You can get more articles like these from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration.

If you have questions or need support, reach out to the AFTD HelpLine at 1-866-507-7222 or [email protected].

FTD ChallengesAfrican American FTDDementia BarriersAFTD SupportFrontotemporal Dementia challenges in Black familiesInitiatives for inclusive research on FTD in diverse populations
Back to Blog

Announcement

African American FTD Challenges

Understanding and Overcoming Challenges in FTD

February 23, 20241 min read

In 2011, it was estimated that there were 50,000-60,000 cases of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in the U.S. Recent research suggests that this number is likely higher due to a lack of representation in studies, especially among Black/African American communities.

Research has shown that Black/African Americans often face obstacles in getting a timely FTD diagnosis. A survey revealed they are less likely to receive prompt diagnoses and often consult with four or more doctors before getting one. Additionally, the symptoms of FTD can present differently in different ethnic/cultural groups.

Black families have reported difficulties convincing practitioners of FTD concerns, leading to delays in diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis may result in higher severity of dementia.

FTD-related symptoms, like disinhibition, can create problems in social situations and with the justice system. Black families face added concerns due to a higher impact from police brutality.

Inclusive FTD Research Initiatives

A study found that families dealing with FTD face nearly twice the annual costs compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. Black/African American families, already facing systemic inequalities, experience heightened challenges.

Efforts are underway to address these challenges. Initiatives focus on inclusive research, overcoming economic and health insurance obstacles, and educating communities. The Biomarker Evaluation in Young Onset Dementia from Diverse Populations (BEYONDD) study aims to understand young-onset dementia in diverse populations, making participation more accessible.

The Alter program collaborates with Black faith communities to create dementia-friendly environments. This program aims to educate, modify environments, and guide congregational leaders in providing support to Black/African American families facing FTD.

Article Resources:

For more information, read the Partners in FTD Care issue on Black/African Americans and FTD.

You can get more articles like these from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration.

If you have questions or need support, reach out to the AFTD HelpLine at 1-866-507-7222 or [email protected].

FTD ChallengesAfrican American FTDDementia BarriersAFTD SupportFrontotemporal Dementia challenges in Black familiesInitiatives for inclusive research on FTD in diverse populations
Back to Blog

Community Events and Support

African American FTD Challenges

Understanding and Overcoming Challenges in FTD

February 23, 20241 min read

In 2011, it was estimated that there were 50,000-60,000 cases of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in the U.S. Recent research suggests that this number is likely higher due to a lack of representation in studies, especially among Black/African American communities.

Research has shown that Black/African Americans often face obstacles in getting a timely FTD diagnosis. A survey revealed they are less likely to receive prompt diagnoses and often consult with four or more doctors before getting one. Additionally, the symptoms of FTD can present differently in different ethnic/cultural groups.

Black families have reported difficulties convincing practitioners of FTD concerns, leading to delays in diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis may result in higher severity of dementia.

FTD-related symptoms, like disinhibition, can create problems in social situations and with the justice system. Black families face added concerns due to a higher impact from police brutality.

Inclusive FTD Research Initiatives

A study found that families dealing with FTD face nearly twice the annual costs compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. Black/African American families, already facing systemic inequalities, experience heightened challenges.

Efforts are underway to address these challenges. Initiatives focus on inclusive research, overcoming economic and health insurance obstacles, and educating communities. The Biomarker Evaluation in Young Onset Dementia from Diverse Populations (BEYONDD) study aims to understand young-onset dementia in diverse populations, making participation more accessible.

The Alter program collaborates with Black faith communities to create dementia-friendly environments. This program aims to educate, modify environments, and guide congregational leaders in providing support to Black/African American families facing FTD.

Article Resources:

For more information, read the Partners in FTD Care issue on Black/African Americans and FTD.

You can get more articles like these from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration.

If you have questions or need support, reach out to the AFTD HelpLine at 1-866-507-7222 or [email protected].

FTD ChallengesAfrican American FTDDementia BarriersAFTD SupportFrontotemporal Dementia challenges in Black familiesInitiatives for inclusive research on FTD in diverse populations
Back to Blog

REFERRAL SERVICES

CONTACT US

5170 Golden Foothills Pkwy,

El Dorado Hills, CA 95762

2023, Your Elder Care Specialist.
www.youreldercarespecialist.com
All Rights Reserved.

REFERRAL SERVICES

CONTACT US

5170 Golden Foothills Pkwy,

El Dorado Hills, CA 95762

www.youreldercarespecialist.com | Your Elder Care Specialists, All Rights Reserved.